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Gum Disease and Heart Disease – How Close is the Relationship?

book[1]The kind of plaque that forms in the arteries that feed the heart have been found to contain the same kind of bacteria that cause gum disease in the mouth. Now, if this isn’t an eye opener, I’m not sure what is. This research is not conclusive, I should add. But, it does point to the possible relationship between the two diseases.

Other studies have shown an elevated risk of heart disease in those who have gum disease. Therefore, while we can not say the correlation is exact, there seems to be enough evidence to show that the presence of diseased gum tissue may contribute to your chances of having a heart attack. Ok, I hope that got your attention.

Now, couple that information with the notion that a large part of the population suffers from gum disease. You can look up your own statistics on that, they vary quite a bit. But even the smallest numbered statistics are alarming. If you think about it, doesn’t it mean that mere brushing and flossing may not be enough to protect you against gum disease?

If you ask me, I would have to say it probably does indicate that. This is a frightening thought. Most of us have been trained from the formative years to brush and floss. But what if it really has never been enough as far as prevention goes?

I’m not suggesting you give up those activities – far from it! They are helpful in reducing the problems that we can face. I’m merely suggesting that they may not be enough. Next: learn more about what you can to to stop or prevent the progression of gum disease in your mouth.

Get your free report: How To Stop Gum Disease at : http://www.HowToSTopGumDisease.com

David Snape is the author of the book: What You Should Know about Gum Disease. ISBN: 978-0981485508 – Available online at most book retailer sites. It can also be ordered by most book stores.

Disclaimer: This article is for information and entertainment purposes only. It does not intend to render advice, diagnosis or treatment. If you have or think you might have gum disease or any other health problem, visit your periodontist or physician for advice, diagnosis and treatment. The USFDA has not evaluated statements about products in this article.

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